Tuesday, 18 June 2024 00:00

Possible Complications of a Broken Ankle

A broken ankle, medically termed ankle fracture, poses significant risks and complications, particularly for active individuals and the elderly. Active individuals are often at risk due to participation in high-impact activities, while the elderly are susceptible due to factors such as decreased bone density and balance issues. One potential complication of a broken ankle is the development of osteoarthritis in the affected joint over time. This occurs due to the disruption of the joint's normal structure and function during the healing process, leading to cartilage degeneration and subsequent pain and stiffness. Elderly individuals, especially those with diabetes, are also prone to complications such as wound healing issues and infections, which can prolong recovery and increase the risk of further complications. Treatment for a broken ankle typically involves immobilization with a cast or brace and pain management. If you have sustained an ankle fracture, it is suggested that you schedule an appointment with a podiatrist who can provide comprehensive care, including monitoring for complications, optimizing rehabilitation, and providing long-term management for optimal foot health.

Broken ankles need immediate treatment. If you are seeking treatment, contact one of our podiatrists from Foot & Ankle Associates of Maine. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet. 

Broken Ankles
A broken ankle is experienced when a person fractures their tibia or fibula in the lower leg and ankle area. Both of these bones are attached at the bottom of the leg and combine to form what we know to be our ankle.

When a physician is referring to a break of the ankle, he or she is usually referring to a break in the area where the tibia and fibula are joined to create our ankle joint. Ankles are more prone to fractures because the ankle is an area that suffers a lot of pressure and stress. There are some obvious signs when a person experiences a fractured ankle, and the following symptoms may be present.

Symptoms of a Fractured Ankle

  • Excessive pain when the area is touched or when any pressure is placed on the ankle
  •  Swelling around the area
  •  Bruising of the area
  • Area appears to be deformed

If you suspect an ankle fracture, it is recommended to seek treatment as soon as possible. The sooner you have your podiatrist diagnose the fracture, the quicker you’ll be on the way towards recovery.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Brunswick, ME . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Incorporating targeted stretches and strengthening routines into your running regimen is a good way to maintain foot health and prevent injuries. Toe stretches involve gently pulling your toes back to stretch the muscles and ligaments along the sole of your foot and toes, promoting flexibility and reducing the risk of strains or cramps during runs. Plantar fascia stretching entails leaning forward to stretch the arch of your foot, to alleviate tension in the plantar fascia, which is a common source of heel pain in runners. Ankle alphabet exercises promote mobility and range of motion in the ankle joint by tracing the alphabet with your toes, helping to reduce the risk of ankle sprains or strains. The marble pickup exercise enhances the intrinsic muscles of the foot, improving their strength and coordination to prevent common running injuries such as metatarsalgia or Morton's neuroma. Incorporating these and other exercises into your routine strengthens your feet, reduces the risk of running-related injuries, and allows you to enjoy your runs with confidence and longevity. If you are experiencing persistent discomfort or have concerns about your foot health, it is suggested that you schedule an appointment with a podiatrist.

Exercising your feet regularly with the proper foot wear is a great way to prevent injuries. If you have any concerns about your feet, contact one of our podiatrists of Foot & Ankle Associates of Maine. Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

How to Prevent Running Injuries

Many common running injuries are caused by overuse and overtraining. When the back of the kneecap starts wearing out and starts causing pain in your knee, this is commonly referred to as runner’s knee. Runner’s knee is a decrease in strength in your quadriceps and can occur if you’re not wearing properly fitted or supporting shoes. To prevent runner’s knee, focusing on hip strengthening is a good idea, as well as strengthening your quads to keep the kneecaps aligned.

What Are Some Causes of Running Injuries?
- One cause of a common running injury is called iliotibial band syndrome.
- Plantar fasciitis is also another common injury.
- Stress fractures can occur from overtraining, lack of calcium, or even your running style.

Best Ways to Prevent Running Injuries
- Wear footwear that fits properly and suits your running needs.
- Running shoes are the only protective gear that runners have to safeguard them from injury.
- Make a training schedule. Adding strengthening exercises as well as regular stretching can help keep you strong and limber and can lessen the possibility of injuries.
- Stretching keeps muscles limber; this will help you gain better flexibility.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Brunswick, ME . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Sunday, 09 June 2024 00:00

It's Time for Beautiful Feet

You don't need an excuse to have beautiful nails. Step outside without worrying about the appearance of your feet.

Peripheral artery disease, or PAD, is a prevalent vascular condition characterized by narrowed arteries that limits blood flow to the extremities (including the feet). The restricted blood flow deprives the feet of oxygen and vital nutrients, leading to a range of symptoms. Individuals with PAD may experience intermittent claudication, a condition marked by pain or cramping in the legs or feet during physical activity but subsides with rest. Other symptoms can include numbness, tingling, or weakness in the feet, particularly while at rest or during nighttime. As PAD progresses, individuals may develop non-healing wounds or ulcers on the feet, which pose a risk of infection and tissue damage. Recognizing the symptoms of PAD and seeking timely medical intervention is essential in managing the condition and preserving foot health. Regular exercise, smoking cessation, and medication management are among the strategies employed to lessen PAD's effects and improve overall vascular health. If you have tingling or numbness in your feet, it is suggested that you visit a podiatrist who can diagnose and help you to manage PAD.

Peripheral artery disease can pose a serious risk to your health. It can increase the risk of stroke and heart attack. If you have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, consult with one of our podiatrists from Foot & Ankle Associates of Maine. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is when arteries are constricted due to plaque (fatty deposits) build-up. This results in less blood flow to the legs and other extremities. The main cause of PAD is atherosclerosis, in which plaque builds up in the arteries.

Symptoms

Symptoms of PAD include:

  • Claudication (leg pain from walking)
  • Numbness in legs
  • Decrease in growth of leg hair and toenails
  • Paleness of the skin
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Sores and wounds on legs and feet that won’t heal
  • Coldness in one leg

It is important to note that a majority of individuals never show any symptoms of PAD.

Diagnosis

While PAD occurs in the legs and arteries, Podiatrists can diagnose PAD. Podiatrists utilize a test called an ankle-brachial index (ABI). An ABI test compares blood pressure in your arm to you ankle to see if any abnormality occurs. Ultrasound and imaging devices may also be used.

Treatment

Fortunately, lifestyle changes such as maintaining a healthy diet, exercising, managing cholesterol and blood sugar levels, and quitting smoking, can all treat PAD. Medications that prevent clots from occurring can be prescribed. Finally, in some cases, surgery may be recommended.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Brunswick, ME . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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